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Posts Tagged ‘New York City’

Bruce Vilanch Will Be Performing Oct 18 At The Cabaret Convention At The Frederick P. Rose Hall, Jazz At Lincoln Center.

Friday, October 13th, 2017

Playbill
Rush Ticket Policy Announced for Cabaret Convention at Jazz at Lincoln Center
BY ANDREW GANS
OCT 10, 2017

4-27-2013 3-29-19 AM

A rush ticket policy has been announced for the 2017 Cabaret Convention, which will feature more than 60 performers. Presented by The Mabel Mercer Foundation, the celebration of New York nightlife will take place October 16-19 at the Frederick P. Rose Hall, Jazz at Lincoln Center.

The same-day rush tickets, available to those holding a student ID or a membership card from MAC (the Manhattan Association of Cabarets & Clubs), will be sold at the box office beginning at 10 AM on the date of each performance. Tickets, priced at $13.50, must be purchased in person, and there is a limit of two tickets per person. The offer is good for any remaining seats in the $100, $50, and $25 tiers.

In a statement, Artistic Director KT Sullivan said, “The Mabel Mercer Foundation sees this offer as an extension of our charter, by which we might provide students—and other performers and musicians—an affordable opportunity to enjoy the great popular songbook, both traditional and present-day. Mabel Mercer herself reveled in singing both the old and the new across her entire 70-year career; she never stopped adding contemporary material to her presentations.”

The gala opening will be followed by evenings that pay tribute to George Gershwin; Hoagy Carmichael, and Richard Whiting as well as the “golden age” of Manhattan’s supper clubs, boites, bistros, and piano bars. Show time each night is 6 PM.

The current lineup follows:

October 16: Gala Opening Night, hosted by KT Sullivan. With Corinna Sowers Adler, Danny Bacher, Carole J. Bufford, Joshua Lance Dixon, Tommy J. Dose, Greg Gropper, Luba Mason, Marilyn Maye, Tanya Moberly, Karen Oberlin, Lyric Peterson, Vivian Reed, Adam Shapiro, Jacob Storms. Presentation of The Donald F. Smith Award, underwritten by Adela and Larry Elow. Presentation of The Mabel Mercer Award to Vivian Reed.

October 17S’Wonderful: The Music of George Gershwin, hosted by Jeff Harnar and Andrea Marcovicci. With Karen Akers, Anna Bergman, Celia Berk, Eric Comstock, Barbara Fasano, Shauna Hicks, Nicolas King, Stearns Matthews, Marissa Mulder, Mark NadlerT. Oliver Reid, Steve Ross, Jennifer Sheehan, Deborah Silver, Gabrielle Stravelli, Jon Weber, Aaron Weinstein.

October 18Intimate Nights: The Golden Age of Cabaret, hosted by James Gavin. With Barbara Brussell, Charles Busch, Charles Cochran, Natalie Douglas, Laura Kenyon, Carol Lipnik, Maude Maggart, Nellie McKay, Sidney MyerMolly Pope, Ricky Ritzel, Spider Saloff, Bruce Vilanch, Ronny Whyte. (This evening is dedicated to Barbara Carroll, “The First Lady of the American Keyboard.”)

October 19Too Marvelous for Words/Stardust: The Music of Hoagy Carmichael & Richard Whiting, hosted by Klea Blackhurst. With Matt Baker, Joie Bianco, Shana Farr, Liam Forde, Eric Yves Garcia, Gregory Generet, Valerie Lemon, Kristoffer Lowe, Tammy McCann, Todd Murray, Josephine Sanges, Billy Stritch, Stacy Sullivan, Carol Woods, Amra-Faye Wright. Presentation of The Margaret Whiting Award, underwritten by My Ideal Music. Presentation of The Julie Wilson Award, underwritten by Linda and Peter Hanson.

Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Frederick P. Rose Hall is located at Broadway and 60th Street. Prices are $100, $50, and $25, and Premium Patron Seating is also available at $500 ($350 of which is tax-deductible). Tickets are for sale through Jazz at Lincoln Center by visiting JALC.org or their box office.

Save the Date for Reel Hope Boulder Featuring Bruce Vilanch

Friday, June 16th, 2017

BOULDER JEWISH NEWS
Save the Date for Reel Hope Boulder Featuring Bruce Vilanch
Alaina Green ??
June 3, 2017

4-27-2013 3-29-19 AM

Join Boulder Jewish Family Service (JFS) for the fifth annual Reel Hope Boulder featuring award-winning writer, comedian, songwriter, and actor Bruce Vilanch on Saturday, October 14 at 7:00 pm at the Boulder JCC, 6007 Oreg Avenue. This fundraising event will include a wine and beer reception with substantial hors d’oeuvres and a first-hand account of Bruce’s storied decades-long career. Sponsors will enjoy an exclusive reception with Bruce at 6:30 pm.

All proceeds support the life-transforming work of Boulder JFS, which provides older adults, adults with disabilities, their families, and individuals in crisis with services to enhance their quality of life.

Bruce VilanchAbout Bruce Vilanch

With his unmistakable presence—characterized by a big-girl figure, oversized red glasses, a shaggy blonde mane, and usually a hilarious T-shirt—Bruce Vilanch has been one of Hollywood’s most colorful characters for decades. His campy presence and outrageous apparel only heighten his broad appeal.

He’s known to many as an onscreen character actor and comedian, but Vilanch achieved his biggest successes as a writer for stand-up comics such as Bette Midler, Billy Crystal, Lily Tomlin, and Rosanne Barr. For many years, he was the go-to comic for stand-up sets and a first-choice writer for events, including the Oscar, Grammy, Emmy, and Tony telecasts.

For more information about sponsorship opportunities and tickets, please contact Bonni Raderman, Boulder JFS development associate, at 720.749.3404 or braderman@jewishfamilyservice.org. Tickets will go on sale in September.

Bruce Vilanch Emcees The Michael Musto Roast

Thursday, May 25th, 2017

Unicorn Booty
14 Hilarious Reads from Michael Musto’s New York City Roast
Written by Alexander Kacala
on May 23, 2017

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Last night, a “who’s who” of New York City gathered to honor Michael Musto at a roast given in his honor. No, really, who was who?

Comedian Bruce Vilanch was the fabulous emcee for the evening. Rosie O’Donnell opened the show with a few words, roasting Musto by reminding the audience of how their relationship began many years ago.
“I know it wasn’t really a shock to anyone in this room that I was a big fucking lesbian but middle America apparently was confused,” O’Donnell said. “And Michael Musto was a very pissed off fag.”

“Very faggy gay men seem to be very troubled by dykey gay women who refuse to acknowledge their lesbianism,” she went on.

But obviously the water is under the bridge, as O’Donnell showed up to support Musto’s event for a good cause. O’Donnell ended her set by matching funds raised for the Callen-Lorde Center, donating $20,000 to the LGBT wellness center in New York City.

Jinkx Monsoon, Bianca Del Rio, Real Housewife LuAnn D’Agostino and Judy Gold were just some of the notable names on the bill, reading each other and the man of the hour. Del Rio of course was a highlight of the night — and right at home up there, as roasting is what she does best.

The evening was produced by Daniel DeMello and Nathaniel Nowak. Directed by Rachel Klein, many of the night’s best jokes were written for the roasters by Erik Ransom and Matthew McLachlan. Even Musto himself wrote some of the best digs made at his own expense.

Here are 14 of the funniest moments from Michael Musto’s roast:
Bruce Vilanch to United Airways:

“I came in from LA for this. It was incredible this morning as they dragged me off my United flight. Which was really unusual because I thought United only does Chinese take-out.”

Michael Musto to Bianca Del Rio:

“Bianca Del Rio, Hurricane Katrina is only the second worst thing to ever happen to New Orleans.”

Bianca Del Rio to Randy Rainbow:

“I don’t really know who Randy Rainbow is, but from the looks of his name, I guarantee he’s not allowed 800 feet anywhere near a grade school.”

Judy Gold to Michael Musto:

“Michael Musto is Al Franken run over by a pride parade.”

Johnny Skandros to Countess LuAnn:

“You’re the worst thing to happen to music since Whitney Houston started taking baths.”

Bianca Del Rio to Rosie O’Donnell:

“She has her differences with Trump. But she is a lot like Trump. She has five different kids from three different wives. It’s funny, because if Rosie goes ahead and buys another child, she will have to live in a shoe. And with her being a lesbian, can you imagine how fucking ugly that shoe is going to be?”

Johnny Skandros to Michael Musto

“I have to give you a lot of credit, Musto. You somehow survived the ’80s. It’s like your face was the original PrEP.”

Jinkx Monsoon to Michael Musto:

“With all the fashion sense of a hospital out-patient, Michael Musto looks like Ray Romano if he had a much harder life.”

Orfeh to Bruce Vilanch:

“These are scary times, folks. I don’t understand how people can continue to deny climate change in 2017. I mean, the proof is right in front of us! It’s almost summer and Bruce Vilanch’s neck pouch is still stuffed with the acorns he foraged last fall!”

Crystal Demure to Bianca Del Rio:

“Other recommended viewings on Netflix for Hurricane Bianca are ‘Gouging Their Eyes Out.’”

Marcus Kelle to Bruce Vilanch:

“The last time you got fucked was by genetics.”

Judy Gold to Jinkx Monsoon:

“You look like Kathy Griffin had sex with meth!”

Lucy The Slut to the drag queens:

“Look at these drag queens! They look great, but their makeup is kinda like Febreeze. Pleasant, but it’s main purpose is to cover up shit.”

Michael Musto to Jinkx Monsoon:

“Jinx, you do a brilliant Edie Beale impression, except she happened to be talented, not just mentally ill.”

The Hollywood Museum Announces Fourth Annual Real to Reel: Portrayals and Perceptions of LGBTQs in Hollywood Exhibit

Sunday, May 21st, 2017

Broadway World
The Hollywood Museum Announces Fourth Annual Real to Reel: Portrayals and Perceptions of LGBTQs in Hollywood Exhibit
by BWW News Desk
May. 20, 2017

Bette Midler and Bruce Vilanch

The Hollywood Museum is thrilled to announce its 2017 salute to the LGBTQ community’s contributions to the entertainment industry. The fourth annual “REAL to REEL: Portrayals and Perceptions of LGBTQs in Hollywood” exhibit, in partnership with Los Angeles City Council member Mitch O’Farrell, is an educational, entertaining and informative retrospective of LGBTQ images in film, TV, new digital platforms featuring costumes, props, photos, and iconic imagery all telling the story of the milestones and influence that LGBTQ characters and plot lines have had in Hollywood from early stereotypes to modern-day representations. Additionally, REAL to REEL celebrates LGBTQ icons those individuals and couples who may be openly LGBTQ or not, and who support the LGBTQ community.

The Hollywood Museum’s REAL to REEL exhibition, which coincides with the annual Christopher Street West Pride activities, offers a historic perspective spanning 100 years from silent films to today’s films, TV shows, and digital platforms. “The museum welcomes the opportunity to create and showcase this important exhibition, sharing with the public the artistic expression and extraordinary significance of the LGBTQ culture and its effect and impact on the world through the medium of entertainment,” says Donelle Dadigan, Founder and President of The Hollywood Museum located in the Historic Max Factor Building.

The exhibit revisits monumental LGBTQ moments in history with Rev. Troy Perry, including the Black Cat riots (1967), and on display – the infamous sign that once hung at the entrance of West Hollywood’s Barney’s Beanery. Exhibit highlights include costumes from Transparent, How to Get Away with Murder, The Walking Dead, Empire, Trans America, Sordid Lives, Cruising, Orange is the New Black, RuPaul’s Drag Race, Ray Donovan, Mad Men, Arrested Development, Cabaret,K-11, as well as Cyndi Lauper’s Grand Marshall Costume (Toronto’s Gay Pride parade, 2015. Additional exhibit items include famous costumes from Hollywood’s leading designers – Mr. Blackwell, Bob Mackie, Rett Turner, Nolan Miller, Edith Head – to today’s Project Runway with Tim Gunn and Heidi Klum, as well as Days of Our Lives, The Bold and the Beautiful, Tyler Perry’s The Haves and Have Nots, Scandal, Two in a Half Men, True Blood, The Good Wife, and more. This year’s exhibit also includes, Icons in the Community such as Betty Davis, Joan Crawford, Elizabeth Taylor, Rock Hudson, Liza Minnelli, Bette Midler, Ramon Navarro, Greg Louganis, Charles Laughton, Sam Harris, Bruce Vilanch, Sherman Hemsley, Gere Jewell, Jerry Herman, Lily Tomlin and Jane Wagner and many more.

The Hollywood Museum gratefully acknowledges the following ABC, Amazon Studios, BBC America, CBS, Discovery Life, Focus Features HBO, Logo, NBC, Netflix, OWN, Showtime, TLC and 20th Century Fox, Universal Pictures, as well as organizations serving the LGBTQ community including ONE Archives, Christopher Street West, The Lavender Effect, and The Glaad Awards, amfAR and more

ABOUT THE HOLLYWOOD MUSEUM IN THE HISTORIC MAX FACTOR BUILDING:
See 10,000 Authentic Show Business Treasures spanning more than 100 years of Hollywood history! Located next to the world famous Hollywood Walk of Fame, the Hollywood Museum in the Historic Max Factor Building houses the largest collection of entertainment memorabilia on display in the world. It is home to thousands of costumes, props, photographs, posters, celebrity automobiles and other treasures from some of the most iconic films and TV shows ever made! See Hollywood legends – past, present, and in the making! The museum attracts thousands of fans from around the world and was recently named one of the top tourist attractions by LA Weekly and by Trip Advisor, and was voted one of the Top 10 Museums in LA by the Los Angeles Tourism & Convention Board. The Hollywood Museum is a 501©3 not-for-profit organization.

REGULAR HOURS: Wednesday – Sunday: 10:00am – 5:00pm (Exhibit: Fri, June 10th – Sun, Sept 4th)
TICKETS: $15 Adults: $12 Seniors (62+): $12 for students with ID and $5 Children under 5.
ADDRESS: 1660 N. Highland Ave. (at Hollywood Blvd.), Los Angeles, CA 90028 MUSEUM INFO: www.TheHollywoodMuseum.com or Tel: (323) 464-7776

FOLLOW THE MUSEUM:
WEBSITE: www.TheHollywoodMuseum.com

FACEBOOK: Facebook.com/TheHollywoodMuseum

 

TV Writer Bruce Vilanch Tells Us How He Slipped Sly Gay Jokes Past the Censors

Monday, May 8th, 2017

Unicorn Booty
TV Writer Bruce Vilanch Tells Us How He Slipped Sly Gay Jokes Past the Censors
May 7, 2017
By Matt Baume
Regular Contributor

Bette Midler and Bruce Vilanch

Bruce Vilanch was toiling away in a perfectly adequate newspaper job in Chicago when Bette Midler came to town. She wasn’t quite famous at that point — an appearance on Broadway and some bathhouse concerts were her credits — but Bruce went to check out her show. Afterwards, he wrote a glowing review, and she called to thank him.

“You should talk more,” he told her.

“You got any good lines?” she asked. He did, and she hired him.

Forty years later, Bruce’s work has touched just about everyone in America. He’s written some of the most famous variety shows ever broadcast, crafted jokes for the Oscars and Emmys and Tonys for decades, and has appeared on everything from RuPaul’s Drag Race to Hollywood Squares to The Simpsons.

I interviewed Bruce Vilanch on my podcast The Sewers of Paris, where every week I talk to gay men about the entertainment that changed their lives. For Bruce, an important early influence were big movie and stage extravaganzas like The Greatest Show on Earth and a Carol Channing flop called The Vamp.

“I taught myself to read with the movie ads,” he recalled. He was obsessed with showbiz from an early age, though his parents tried to steer him toward more reliable work as a doctor or lawyer. They’d take him to films set in courtrooms and point out that attorneys get to perform; but he knew he needed a different kind of limelight.

“I used to have a routine in a hula skirt that was embarrassing to everyone,” he said. “I would have taken a job on the hood of your car, jiggling as you drove.”

An adventurous aunt told him stories of the world and accompanied him on trips into Manhattan. He attempted a career on stage, but discovered that his look and his skills were a little too idiosyncratic. So he went into journalism, and that’s where he had his big break when he wrote about Bette Midler.

“She found the beauty in trash,” he said of her at the time. She’d come out on stage looking a little disheveled and unpredictable, though “the talent was there.” Audiences loved it, particularly when she was on tour and told jokes about local landmarks and figures. The secret of those jokes was that Bruce would leverage his journalism connections to write them, calling colleagues at local papers to find out what the big scandals were before Bette arrived in town.

Eventually, he made his way to Los Angeles, where he’d get his start writing variety shows for Cher, the Brady Bunch, and the Manhattan Transfer. When he could, he’d slip sly queer references into the shows, though they always had to be coded.

“Did you feel exasperated that you couldn’t say gay?” I asked him during our chat.


“It was challenging,” he replied. “It wasn’t frustrating because it hadn’t been done. … That was a couple years off.”

Nevertheless, he still delighted in the sly gay references he was able to place in shows like Hollywood Squares. “It was ‘inside,’ we called it,” he said. “The ones who get it will laugh and the ones who don’t will say ‘what was that?’”

It’s a vastly different world now, of course. But the freedom that gay writers and comedians now have on television is only possible because of pioneers like Bruce.

Listen to the full interview with Bruce below or at SewersOfParis.com.

‘Kings & Queens in Their Castles’ is an intimate look at LGBT lives

Sunday, April 23rd, 2017

The Washington Post
‘Kings & Queens in Their Castles’ is an intimate look at LGBT lives
By Michele Langevine Leiby April
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When Tom Atwood decided to launch himself into fine art photography, it was mostly because he wanted to see a different image of gay men. Until not long ago, most photographic images of gay men fell into one of two categories: a display of the ravages of AIDS or a paean to the idealized, sexualized beauty of the masculine form (usually nude or in advanced stages of undress).

Atwood’s new book, “Kings & Queens in Their Castles,” offers an alternative view. His style, the photographer says, is a studied melange of portraiture and architectural photography.

“I try to challenge my subjects by showing as much of their environment as possible in the frame of the camera,” he says. “I also use a wide-angle lens and a wide depth of field so that both the subject and the background are in focus.”

Atwood, 45, a self-proclaimed autodidact, has no formal background in photography or art history. His approach was honed through trial and error and a passion for his subject matter.

“I started out photographing gay people at home because I am gay and knew a lot of gay people,” he says. “And I think a lot of gay men especially have a flair for design and live in some really playful places.”

Atwood’s subjects in “Kings & Queens” include more than 160 members of the LGBT community. They’re urban and rural, famous and anonymous, beautiful and plain, extraordinary and decidedly ordinary. His work, displaying an intimacy sometimes bordering on voyeurism, captures LGBT men and women in the process of living their private lives.

Some of today’s tumultuous social movements rely on a fair amount of identity politics. This book isn’t about that. Says Atwood: “I thought it would be interesting to photograph this group of people just in everyday moments since, for most people, their sexuality is a part of who they are, but it’s not the predominant part of who they are.”

Here are six of the book’s compelling stories:






Don Lemon

When Atwood arrived at Don Lemon’s Harlem home, the CNN anchor was getting ready to walk his dog. “He’s very friendly, very easygoing, very approachable,” Atwood says. “I realized he’s just a really a social person that’s part of a neighborhood.” He shot Lemon sitting on a skateboard on his balcony, his neighborhood as a backdrop. “I really wanted to shoot people in their everyday environment and show what their private lives are like rather than focus on their public images.”

HollyTaylorAlisonBechdel1489605841

 

 



Holly Taylor and Alison Bechdel

Atwood photographed the women in the garden of their Jericho, Vt., home. Holly Taylor, a self-declared “compost maven,” and Alison Bechdel, a cartoonist and the author of the Broadway musical “Fun Home,” live in the woods. “I love this photo,” says Atwood, himself a Vermonter. “I think it really shows a real Vermont sensibility in a number of ways. They’ve got a garden. They chop their own wood. They heat their house with wood.”





Mother Flawless Sabrina

Considered a pioneer in the transgender and gay communities, Mother Flawless Sabrina ran a national drag pageant enterprise between 1959 and 1969 that put on shows across the country, culminating with an extravaganza in New York. The 77-year-old lives on Manhattan’s Upper East Side surrounded by a bevy of quirky possessions: a 1980s-era telephone with giant buttons, wigs strewn about, jewelry draped on an ornate desk. “She’s a female impersonator, which I guess is a little different from a drag queen, but don’t ask me the difference because I’m not sure I know,” Atwood says.

 

James McGreevey


The former governor of New Jersey will always be famous for the 2004 news conference in which he publicly came out of the closet, his pained wife by his side. “My truth is that I am a gay American,” he declared. Today McGreevey is a Prius-driving resident of Plainfield, N.J., where Atwood photographed him, clad in shorts and a hoodie, pruning ivy in front of his house. “He did go through some difficult times,” Atwood says, “but he seems to be still happy and proud and willing to share his life through this book.”

 

 





Bruce Vilanch

Loyal viewers of the television game show “Hollywood Squares” will surely recognize the unruly mop of comedian Bruce Vilanch, whom Atwood photographed ferrying groceries back to his West Hollywood apartment. “I think this is a fun shot because Los Angeles has a lot of outdoor/indoor living spaces,” Atwood says, and Vilanch’s apartment building has hallways that are outside rather than inside.




Randal Kleiser

“I don’t think it’s that common to keep barn animals in Los Angeles,” Atwood says of the menagerie of pets that share the home of film director Randal Kleiser. “It was an otherwise suburban ranch house.” Kleiser, known for such films as “Grease” and “Big Top Pee-wee,” enjoys a spectacular view of the L.A. skyline from his swimming pool. “I like that there’s this strong light from the side in this picture and you can see a lot in both the foreground and background,” the photographer says. (Can you find BOTH horses?)