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Posts Tagged ‘California’

Why The Show “Silver Foxes” Would Be Great For Television

Wednesday, August 16th, 2017

TV On Demand
Why The Show “Silver Foxes” Would Be Great For Television
By Dana Hanson-Firestone
August 11, 2017

4-27-2013 3-29-19 AM
A new show has been created but it is struggling to get noticed by Hollywood. “Silver Foxes is a sitcom that is patterned after the long running and beloved “Golden Girls.” It is a reboot of the show and the rumor is that George Takei is set to star in it. The creators of the show are disappointed because their work is not getting the attention that they had hoped for. So far, nobody has picked the series up. Here is a little more about the show and the reasons why it would be great for television.

The creators

Stan Zimmerman and James Berg and the screenwriters responsible for bringing the concept to script form. The series takes place in Palm Springs, California and it is about four older men who are gay, living together. It definitely has taken its’ inspiration from “The Golden Girls,” but it is not a spinoff. Zimmerman disclosed that he and Berg are experiencing a total shutout from Hollywood. Zimmerman is the writer for several episodes of “Roseanne,” “The Gilmore Girls,” and the movie “A Very Brady Sequel.” He believes that there is a degree of homophobia and ageism involved in the block.

Proposed cast members

Should the series be granted the opportunity to air, it will Star the famous George Takei, Todd Sherry, Bruce Vilanch and Leslie Jordan as the four main characters. The cast was assembled in 2016 and here a year later, there is no move to make the show a reality.

Why the show should air








The show would be funny

We could all use some great humor. Why can’t we as entertained by four guys as we were by four women? The answer is, that we could. It would be a lot like a double dose of “The Odd Couple.” While there are serious legal battles going on to protect the rights of LGBTQ people, The show would be a timely addition to the lineup of favorites. Who knows…perhaps it would be a bit hit that would give a network’s ratings a good healthy lift.

Takei’s thinking on the matter

George has shared the fact that he is frustrated over the hold placed on “Silver Foxes.” He hit the nail on the head when he discussed the show as a “commentary on contemporary life.” It could represent a challenge for networks that have a large homophobic viewing audience. Producers are having a rough time making the decision to take the project under their wings.

Will the show fade into obscurity?

Zimmerman is optimistic about the chances that the show will eventually get air time. If all else fails, he may resort to a streaming service. There are plenty of fans who would appreciate the show and it sounds like something that would draw a huge audience. We’re all hoping that there will be a change in Hollywood and that they’ll at least give the series its’ shot.

Bruce Vilanch Spoke At The Black Cat LGBT Protests Feb 11, 2017

Friday, February 17th, 2017

Advocate
Bruce Vilanch Spoke At The Black Cat LGBT Protests Feb 11, 2017
BY ADVOCATE.COM EDITORS
FEBRUARY 11 2017 6:35 PM EST

2017-02-17_5-55-37

When a rally tonight in Los Angeles honors the Black Cat protest — which preceded Stonewall by two years — it will be a reminder to President Trump and his administration that protest works.

“You put a microphone in front of me, I’m going to talk about Trump,” said Mitch O’Farrell, the Los Angeles city councilman who is helping organize the rally, which begins at 8 p.m. outside the Black Cat Tavern.

O’Farrell says the Trump administration’s anti-equality agenda is backfiring. “Their authoritarian and anti-constitutional executive orders are galvanizing other historically oppressed communities into greater solidarity,” he said. Trump is giving Americans “an opportunity for us to be more enlightened and stand in stronger solidarity.”

The Black Cat protest in 1967 was itself a turning point triggered by authority. Undercover officers had gone on New Year’s Eve to the tavern in the Silver Lake neighborhood of Los Angeles and waited until the clock struck midnight, when partygoers would kiss. It was illegal to kiss a person of the same sex. As partners embraced, the officers took out their badges and started violently making arrests.

The queer community was fed up with regular police brutality and took what was a highly unusual step: they organized a protest on February 11, 1967.

The founders of that protest would also create a group — Personal Rights in Defense and Education, or PRIDE — and that group created a newsletter called The Advocate. That newsletter became the magazine you’re reading now.

A lot has changed in 50 years. At tonight’s rally, for example, police are taking part in commemorating history. But LGBT Americans also have to contend with President Trump, whose policies are met repeatedly with protests. The Women’s March the day after Trump’s inauguration included millions of people across multiple cities all over the world. Protests broke out the next weekend at airports when Trump signed an executive order that implemented his Muslim ban at the border. Last weekend, a queer solidarity rally was held outside the Stonewall Inn in New York City after Trump threatened to sign a “religious freedom” order, which would make it optional for federal workers to recognize same-sex marriages so long as they cite a religion that says it’s immoral.

This weekend, as Los Angeles marks history, it will also be speaking directly to Trump and the likes of attorney general Jeff Sessions. Late Friday night, Sessions’ Justice Department filed a legal brief that effectively ends the Obama administration’s protections for transgender students. They had been guaranteed, for example, the right to use bathrooms and other facilities that match their gender identity.

O’Farrell says the Black Cat proves that protest works.

“It just underscores the power of the U.S. Constitution and how we always lean towards advancements,” he said. “One misguided president being in office can not and will not reverse all of that progress. Understandably, there is a lot of anxiety fear and chaos created by what he’s doing, but we will prevail over all of that and we have the Constitution, and we have our level of sophisticated activism. The LGBT community knows how to effect change and that is one of our great strengths.”

Other speakers scheduled to be at the Black Cat rally tonight include Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti, the cast of Queer as Folk, actors Wilson Cruz, Guillermo Díaz and Darryl Stevens, plus comedians Alec Mapa and Bruce Vilanch, executive director of Equality California Rick Zbur, and editor in chief of The Advocate, Lucas Grindley.

Celebrities share New Year’s resolutions with Gay Star News

Monday, January 2nd, 2017

Gay Star News
Celebrities share New Year’s resolutions with Gay Star News
30 December 2016
by


A new year is upon us and Gay Star News caught up with several celebrities at the Trevor Live! event in Beverly Hills earlier this month to ask them about New Year’s resolutions. Here is what they had to say:

Jack_Falahee

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jack Falahee (How to Get Away With Murder star): ‘Eat less cake.’

Noah-Galvin
Noah Galvin (The Real O’Neals star): ‘Never stop learning.’

Brian_Justin_Crum_AGT
Brian Justin Crum (America’s Got Talent Finalist): ‘To be a little more selfless. I need to focus on my friendships a little more and taking care of those a little more. This past year has been so wild with the show and I feel like I’ve dropped the ball on taking care of my friends and they’ve been so good at taking care of me.’

lance-bass
Lance Bass (singer and television host): ‘I don’t do New year’s resolutions because I never keep them. So I don’t want to be disappointed. So why another disappointment.’

darren_young
]Darren Young (WWE superstar): ‘My New Year’s resolution is to get real lean. I’m going to start boxing and lean up a little bit. It’s to reshape my body but you never know – I could always transition to MMA. How cool would it be to be the first LGBT MMA fighter that’s in UFC.’

Jonnor
Hayden Byerly (The Fosters star): Do better, be better, work on myself as a person. I want to really strengthen who I am and gain a lot of self-confidence and assurance and make sure that I am happy with who I am.’

bruce_vilanch
Bruce Vilanch (comedy actor and writer): ‘They really are really kind of cliche and I never pay attention to them because you always end up breaking them. Every year I’m going to lose weight. Look at me!’

Chicago’s Legacy Walk LGBT History Museum to honor Sylvia Rivera, Vito Russo, October 15, 2016

Wednesday, September 21st, 2016

Windy City Media Group
Chicago’s Legacy Walk LGBT History Museum to honor Sylvia Rivera, Vito Russo
Press Release
Sept. 19, 2016

456007788

Dedicated in 2012, Chicago’s Legacy Walk is the world’s only outdoor LGBT History Museum. This half-mile installation features bronze biographical memorials celebrating the lives of people like Leonard Bernstein, Audre Lorde, Sally Ride, James Baldwin, Jane Addams, Rudolf Nureyev, Frida Kahlo and Alan Turing.

The Legacy Walk’s markers serve as an “outdoor classroom” for bullied LGBTQ youth who come for guided tours in order to learn about historically significant positive LGBT role models whose contributions have made an incalculable difference in the world we share.

On October 15, 2016 they welcome two LGBT activist superstars to the Legacy Walk: transgender icon Sylvia Rivera from the Stonewall Era, and gay film activist/historian Vito Russo, who co-founded both ACT UP (AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power) and GLAAD (Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation). Their considerable legacies will soon be added to the 35 incredible stories of achievement which already line the only streetscape of its kind in existence.

This all-day tribute will feature legendary gay activist Cleve Jones, Chicago transgender spokesperson Myles Brady-Davis, Emmy Award-Winning writer-producer-actor Bruce Vilanch, and trans pioneer Judy Bowenwiener, a close personal friend of Sylvia and Marsha P. Johnson from the post-Stonewall Era. Judy will be talking about their involvement as three trans women in New York’s Gay Activist Alliance (GAA). She will be joined by Phillip Raia, who worked with both Vito and Sylvia in GAA in the 1970s. Never have all these people been brought together for a celebration quite like this.

The event will be in three parts:

1-3 p.m.: Opening Reception and Program, Center on Halsted

Transgender activist Myles Brady-Davis, Howard Brown Health, gay activist Cleve Jones, NAMES Project AIDS Memorial Quilt, “Reflecting on the Evolution of Activism across the Decades.”

3-4 p.m.: Legacy Walk Induction Ceremonies, Northalsted Streetscape, featuring the LGBTQ Youth from Lyons Township High School.

Sylvia Rivera Bronze Memorial Dedication, 3656 N. Halsted: Personal reflections of Judy Bowenwiener and Phillip Raia, Sylvia Rivera’s friends.

Vito Russo Bronze Memorial Dedication, 3411 N. Halsted, personal reflections of Bruce Vilanch, Emmy Award-winning writer-producer-actor.

4-6 p.m.: Celebration Party, Sidetrack, 3349 N. Halsted, “Building a New Legacy for the Future of Our Past.”

Tickets for this multi-part event are available for $30, $50, and $100 and include light appetizers and variable bar service. There will also be raffle prizes and door prizes. LGBT people from throughout the metropolitan area are expected to turn out to celebrate this unique Chicago cultural institution—built by our community, for our community—in this salute to the contributions of LGBT people.

TICKETS CAN BE PURCHASED AT:

www.eventbrite.com/e/legacy-walk-dedication-v-tickets-27530936773 .

Musical based around Petula Clark songs opens up in Connecticut. What to expect?

Saturday, July 30th, 2016

BlastingNews
Musical based around Petula Clark songs opens up in Connecticut
Published on:29 July 2016

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A stage-show based around the songs of the 1960’s British songstress, Petula Clark, has opened up in Connecticut, titled A Sign of the Times.

What to expect?
According to the press release, the story is not that of Petula Clark herself, despite featuring quite a good number of her songs. Instead, the play tells of an original story of a girl named Cindy who runs away from Middle America to Manhattan in the year of 1965, and the various misadventures that ensue. A press release give the show the tagline of “Forget all your troubles, forget all your cares —go “Downtown” and find out who you are!,” taken from Clark’s song, “Downtown,” which is one of the many songs featured in the show.

In the current show, Cindy is played by Ephie Aardema, a Broadway veteran. Other actors include Robert Lenzi, Bryan Fenkart, Nick Bailey, and Crystal Lucas-Perry. Esnsemble includes Lauren Boyd, Lauren Nicole Chapman, Jeremy Gaston, Alexandra Matteo, Kevin Santos, Keven Quillon, Dave Schoonover and Alet Taylor, many of whom have appeared in Broadway shows as well as other shows for the Connecticut theatre.

The book or libretto was written by Bruce Vilanch and the story was created by Richard Robin. Gabriel Barre serves as director. JoAnn M. Hunter serves as a choreographer. Performances will begin July 29 and will last until early September at the Norma Terris Theatre, which is owned by the Goodspeed Musicals theater company, in Chester, Connecticut. Tickets can be purchased through the theatre’s box office or online at Goodspeed’s website.

The show includes such popular Clark songs as “Color My World,” “Kiss Me Goodbye,” “Who Am I,” “Call Me,” “Don’t Sleep in the Subway” and “The Boy From New York City,” in addition to the namesake song, which can be seen below.

That said, Petula Clark is not the only icon of the Sixties to be a part of the show. In addition, the show is said to feature songs from other artists of the decade, such as Lesley Gore’s “You Don’t Own Me” and the Fontella Bass number, “Rescue Me.” Even one Elvis number, “If I Can Dream,” will appear in the show. #Music

New Vilanch musical plans a tuneful, funny flashback that’s relatable

Saturday, July 23rd, 2016

New Haven Register
New Goodspeed musical plans a tuneful, funny flashback that’s relatable
By Joe Amarante
07/22/16, 12:25 PM EDT

4-27-2013 3-49-54 AM

CHESTER >> In the news: Rancorous politics, nuts with guns, hateful cults of death and a drug-overdose “epidemic.”

In the theaters and galleries, meanwhile? Maybe a chance to catch your breath.

“I think theater as an escape is completely wonderful,” said director Gabriel Barre the other day, before rehearsals for the new musical “A Sign of the Times.” “There’s nothing wrong with that and a lot of entertainment can and should provide an ability to transport an audience; let’s call it that instead of escape.”

But what Barre is really drawn to, he said in a phone interview, is a show that can do that as well as “make you look at your life in a different way.”

“For me, I want people to be transported and laugh and have a good time and be dazzled and be surprised, of course,” Barre said. “But I also want them to think a little bit and to be emotionally moved, as well.”

Barre is directing “A Sign of the Times” at The Terris Theatre in Chester — about a woman from the sticks who moves to New York City in the 1960s amid the era’s backdrop of women’s liberation, the civil rights movement and anti-war protests. The musical runs from July 29 to Sept. 4 at Goodspeed Musicals’ development theater on North Main Street.

The title is based on the Petula Clark song, and Barre said it’s relatable.

“It’s quite interesting to juxtapose this song, and the protests of the ’60s that are depicted in this show, with the protests that are happening today,” Barre said. “And what’s remarkable to realize is… the signs of the times in the ’60s are not that different — sadly perhaps, tragically perhaps — than the signs of these times.

Still, Barre & Co. are creating a musical from scratch here, which is always daunting.

“That’s sort of the fun of it for me,” said Barre, who’s done several new shows at Goodspeed’s Terris Theatre as well as established musicals elsewhere and at the main Goodspeed theater in East Haddam.

Barre likes the older musicals, but he enjoys the challenge of the development process, too — “making sure the shows are clear, not too long, not too short. I’m really looking at it as a dramaturge, as an advocate for the audience.”

This one involves taking older songs — many by British singer Clark — and weaving them into “a completely new and original story.”

That was one of the first challenges that writer Bruce Vilanch had to face on the project. You know Vilanch — the hefty, blonde-haired writer who was head writer for the Academy Awards for years, not to mention “Hollywood Squares,” where he also occupied a square near Whoopi Goldberg. He also played Edna Turnblad in “Hairspray” on Broadway and has written for Bette Midler and Diana Ross shows.

Richard Robin came up with the basic story idea and Vilanch took it from there, in later collaboration with Barre and the music staff led by Rick Fox and Joseph Church.

“I’m proud of the way we’ve woven these songs into the life of this young woman, Cindy, who’s from the Midwest and comes to New York to find her purpose in New York,” said Barre.

These types of shows — from tuneful “Bikinis” to the Queen tune-fest “We Will Rock You” — can be very thin in plot and real meaning. But this one is not just a jukebox musical, said Barre, although it does crank out the 1960s hits of Clark, Lesley Gore, Nancy Sinatra and others.

“We have six main characters who all have their own subplots and relationships. So we have a plot that’s very plausible… It’s more than a thin membrane that links the songs.”

Barre said the team is concentrating on the tone of the show. “We’re really investing in these characters and hope everyone else will, as well — taking the material seriously in the right places, but also having lots of fun here and there.”

Being a Terris show, the audience will help determine how that works and help the show find the right balance, Barre said.

Why Petula Clark music (“Downtown,” “I Know a Place”) as a focus? In the show’s notes, Vilanch says he always thought Clark’s songs sounded like they were from a musical.

“Like country songs, in a way, these songs have great character,” said Barre.

Barre said most of us know the tunes “but we sometimes dismiss the lyrics and just sing along. But in the context of a show, they actually (fit) quite well and come quite easily out of the mouths of characters that Bruce and Richard have drawn here.”

So much so that it sounds like a contemporary musical, Barre said.

And like watching the Abba musical “Mamma Mia!” the audience will have fun seeing “that engineering going on” and how the songs are justified.

There’s comedy with the music, of course.

Barre called Vilanch a “great, great person with a big heart… I’ve actually worked with him before on some benefits… I love watching him put together jokes and, of course, he’s been a laugh riot in rehearsals, which I expected. But what’s really surprising to me is his encyclopedic knowledge of … musical theater… He just knows every show that’s ever been done, who starred in it, when they left… But he knows a lot about the world (too).”

And there’s plenty of dance, said Barre, crafted by choreographer JoAnn Hunter and mainly performed by an ensemble of 10 dancers.

“The whole show was conceived by me and JoAnn and the team… as a constant flowing spectacle that never stops, in a way,” said Barre. “Even the transitions are all choreographed.”

If it works, the show indeed will transport viewers to not just another troubled time but a magical place.

“I think that (parallel) is one of the things that makes this show not just fluff or trivial or a jukebox musical that you can just go and escape… but that it’s a show that will actually remind people that Americans are still trying to find what it (America) is and who we are and what does it mean to be American.

“What does it mean to be patriotic? Does it mean you commit to the country as it is or can you be just as patriotic and be committed to changing it?”

Cindy (played by Ephie Aardema) goes from being an amateur photographer to a professional in the show, which gives the show license to use projections of images from the era, too. And evocative images are certainly a sign of both times, too, for bad or good.

Curtain times are Wednesday at 2 and 7:30 p.m., Thursday at 7:30 p.m., July 29 at 8, July 30 at 3 and 8, and July 31 at 2 and 6:30. Tickets ($49 or less) are available a 860-873-8668 or online at goodspeed.org.